The Truth About The Confederate Flag

I try to keep my posts as lighthearted as possible, but as a black man I cannot ignore the blatant racism going on in the US, which I can honestly say is nearly as blatant today as it was in the 1960s.

With all the controversy surrounding the Confederate Flag, it’s amazing how misinformed and ignorant some are. If you honestly believe that the Confederate Flag is “heritage not hate”, then I apologize in advance for calling you an idiot. The Truth About The Confederate Flag

Why calling the Charleston shooting terrorism is important to so many people

There’s a habit that we have as Americans to call a spade a spade unless it hits close to home. The media immediately and correctly labeled the World Trade Center attacks of 2001 as terrorism. Yet, when Dylan Hook walked into a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. this month and brutally murdered nine people, the media quickly classified it as a lone incident by a troubled youth. Why calling the Charleston shooting terrorism is important to so many people

Racism Will Be Cured By Action, Not Discussion.

Here we go again…

Connecticut College canceled classes Monday to hold day-long discussions on racism and hate speech following the discovery of the words “No N***ers” written several times on the walls of a campus building. This comes a few days after a school custodian was told to “shut the f**k up you ignorant n***er”, and just weeks after a professor posted a Facebook status describing Palestinians in Gaza as “a rabid pit bull chained in a cage, regularly making mass efforts to escape.” Racism Will Be Cured By Action, Not Discussion.

The “N” Word

I have a complicated relationship with the “N” word.

It is a part of the normal vernacular in the neighborhood I grew up in. Depending on the tone of voice used, it can mean a number of different things. It isn’t in my regular vocabulary, but in the past it has been known to roll off of my tongue with ease.
The “N” Word

Oreo

I remember being at a swim camp in Wisconsin with three of my teammates when I was about 11. We were the only black kids out of maybe 60 campers, and it’s safe to assume that a lot of them had never met a black person in real life. Oreo